Home / Blog / Illustrator Tutorials / WHAT IS LOW POLY ART AND HOW TO DO IT (IN ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR)
WHAT IS LOW POLY ART AND HOW TO DO IT (IN ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR)

WHAT IS LOW POLY ART AND HOW TO DO IT (IN ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR)

with 10 Comments

What is LOW POLY ART?

If you’re not familiar with this term, you’ve certainly seen the style. Simple geometric shapes placed side-by-side to create angular, often minimalist, compositions. The “poly” from low poly comes from the word “polygon,” which is merely a 2-dimensional shape made of straight lines and angles.

Image via mathisfun.com

The use of low poly art comes from the early days of 3D animation. Mocking up 3D scenes using a low polygonal resolution helped to reduce render times, which greatly sped up the development process of video games and animated movies.

Technology has come a long way, but even today low poly is used to decrease render time. In fact, the low poly “look” has become something of a design trend. Video games, 3D artists, and even illustrators are using simple polygons in their compositions to communicate texture and depth without sacrificing a minimalist aesthetic.

Here are some great examples of low poly art that span a number of different design styles:

 


By Paul Douard (Paris, France). Jack Nicholson smoking a cigar, comprised of 2520 polygons.

 

By CAZAPAPELES (Monterrey, Mexico). The red cape project is a cardboard installation that seeks to bring back memories of childhood using cardboard polygons.

 

By Jona Dinges (Mainz, Germany). A series of low poly characters, with fantasy and action/adventure themes.

 

Now it’s time to do your own LOW POLY art-work!

I’m sure that you want to try this!… So here’s the tutorial for creating your own art pieces…

It’s important for us to share your thoughts about the video you watched above. Therefore your comments are always welcome. Plus, if you like what you watched above why don’t you sign up to be added to our mailing list and why not be the first to hear our new posts and other surprises 😉

 

SIGN UP NOW

References: Hannah Shaffer, Studio-H and music by Makaih Beats

 

Share this post with

10 Responses

  1. Brenda
    | Reply

    your post is just excellent and i can assume you’re an expert on this subject.
    Fine with your permission let me to grab your RSS feed to keep updated with forthcoming post. Thanks a million.

  2. aguirre
    | Reply

    – Awesome article –

  3. WESLEY
    | Reply

    i was looking for this
    thank you

  4. Patrick
    | Reply

    fascinating!

  5. deborah
    | Reply

    I ѵisited variօus sites but the posts, existing at this website are truly marvelouѕ.

  6. Cassandra
    | Reply

    I’m able to find good information from your articles.

  7. keenan
    | Reply

    Its like you read my mind! You seem to know a lot about this, like you wrote the book in it or something.
    I think that you can do with some pics to drive the message home a bit, but instead of that, this is wonderful blog.

    A fantastic read. I will definitely be back.

  8. Roy Wilkie
    | Reply

    I’m working on my second low-poly illustration, also from a photo. It’s incredible how long it can take.. I have found a couple techniques which do speed it up a bit, though;
    1. start by making guides – just lines made of straight segments – around features you want to make sure are clearly visible
    2. make the first polys all based around those guides – and don’t fill in their colors. just stay in pen tool mode.
    3. only after you have a good # of polygons drawn, then go in and sample-fill, sample-fill..

    what I REALLY want to find though, is a way to just add a ton of points, then have Illustrator (or any app) automatically connect them, just forming polygons, not crossing lines..

    I mean of course, you could just outline objects and then draw lines through the shapes, then cut it all up into separate shapes using Shape Builder, but I think that looks messy. When I make mine I just use triangles, I think it makes for a cleaner final product.

    • lowpolynator
      | Reply

      Hi Roy,

      For a less time-consuming option please try lowpolynator.com. Just upload a photo and wait about 20s for the lowpoly result. Admittedly, it works better for some images than others, just check out the website to see what it can do.

      Thanks,
      Lowpolynator

  9. Danito.Drums
    | Reply

    This is just amazing. Thank you so much for this article and the video tutorial. I’m working on my first Low Poly right now and this technique is just absolutely perfect!

    Keep up the good work!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.